Friday, September 4, 2009

Agricolonialism

The editorial in 'The Hindu' news paper on 27/08/2009 with the heading 'The spectre of agricolonialism' rings an alarm bell, actually a loud siren, to the policy makers and to the traditional farmers.

The traditional farm lands in this part of south Tamilnadu are slowly but steadily purchased out by the so called farmers from the neighboring states. There is neither a hue and cry about this 'land grabbings' nor an expression of sorrow by the selling farmer. There is only happiness since farming is wrongly considered as un remunerative.

This sorry state of affair is at a time, when there is talk about '2nd Green Revolution in India' and the prevailing bright possibilities to achieve a quantum jump in agriculture production.

The main problem in India is small landholdings coupled with the lack of scientific agriculture management practices result in productivity levels that are 1/5th - 1/10th of farms in US and Israel.

We can overcome this problem, since we are blessed with agro-climatic conditions that permit farming around the year, by bringing managerial and engineering talents together for overall agricultural producvity improvement in India. These include adressing issues like better crop selection, regional agro-climatic conditions, land preparation, fertilization, irrigation, pest control etc.

Now, the poor third world countries are facing a problem of 'agricolonialism' a new term coined by 'The Hindu' wherein some nations lest alone multinational companies are buying up millions of hectares of vast tracts of farmland in parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

Read this link to understand the kind of catostropic condition we the farmers are in.

Regards,
Vishnu Sankar

1 Comentário:

Vishnu Sankar said...

Response from Er.Sundar about our query in this post is rapid and elaboarte. He has provided contact addresses of TNAU and URLs also. Thanks a lot to him.
His comments:
Dear sir,
Yesterday I tried to answer your quries.I could not complete since there were several virus problems in my computer.

Today I am trying to do it.
IT is surprising that you are able to update your blogspot immediately.

The images next to laser leveller are detailed below:

1,2. Tapioca harvester - TNAU Model - 2004 - Rs.8,000 in 2004 - 1.60 Ha per day - 35 HP Tractor required

3. Tractor drawn turmeric harvester - TNAU Model - 2004 - Rs.8,000 in 2004 - 1.60 Ha per day - 35 HP Tractor required

4. Power tiller operated Turmeric harvester - TNAU Model - 2004 - Rs.15,000 in 2004 - 0.60 Ha per day

5. PARA Plough - For mulch tillage and moisture conservation under dry farming condition - TNAU Model - 2004 - Rs7,750 in 2004 - 0.20 Ha per hour - 35 HP Tractor required

There is a heading with a photo
Different types of cono weeder:
It may be corrected as:

Different types of manual weeders for wet and dry lands (Since it consists of Two row Rotary weeder, Single Rotary weeder, Single Rotary weeder, Cono weeder, Single Rotary weeder, the other four are dry land weeders)

For further details visitors may be advised to contact

1. Professor and Head
Department of Farm Machinery
Agricultural Engineering College and Research Institute
Tamil Nadu Agricultural University
Coimbatore 641 003.
Ph : 0422-2431222 - Extn 257.
FAX : 0422-2456478
E-mail : farmmech@tnau.ac.in

2. Professor and Head
Zonal Research Centre
Agricultural Engineering College and Research Institute
Tamil Nadu Agricultural University
Coimbatore 641 003.
Ph : 0422-2431222 - Extn 204.
FAX : 0422-2456478
E-mail : zrc@tnau.ac.in

A link to the following TNAU web pages may also be made
http://www.tnau.ac.in/tech/implements/farmmac.htm

http://www.tnau.ac.in/aecricbe/aetc/contindex.htm

For nay further details kindly E-Mail
Yours
R.Sundar

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